Seeking more is often the cause of our problems, not the solution

Today’s culture propagates that we can solve our problems by getting more – more money, more possessions, more comforts.

But does getting more make us more satisfied? Not really. Because when we crave for more, our mind becomes habituated to looking at the things we don’t have.

Thereafter, even if we get something that we had craved for, still our satisfaction is sadly short-lived. Why? Because the covetous mind soon returns to obsessing over the things we don’t have. No matter how many things we get, our mind keeps us stuck in incurable dissatisfaction.

The mind’s obsession with more can even make us destructive. The Bhagavad-gita (16.13-15) outlines how the craving for more and more money can make people depraved – they cast aside their morality, humanity and spirituality while doing whatever it takes to fulfill their desires. For example, some people, craving for more wealth through indiscriminate industrialization, often wreak havoc with the environment and with the livelihoods of millions who depend on nature’s delicate balances. Indeed, “more” is the cause of most of our problems, individually and socially.

If we don’t want to stay perpetually dissatisfied, we need to change our focus from what we don’t have to what we do have.

Gita wisdom facilitates this change by revealing a treasure we always have. It explains that we are at our core souls, parts of the whole, Krishna. We can find lasting satisfaction only by connecting lovingly with him. He is our greatest treasure and is always present in our hearts. Bhakti-yoga is a time-honored process for becoming aware of his presence – his indwelling, loving, enduring presence. The more we focus steadily on him, the more we become attached to him, thereby feeling internally satisfied, even enriched.

Being thus enriched, we act for contribution, not accumulation.


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