To change the way you feel, change the way you think

Suppose someone wants to rid a field of weeds – and they get a lawn mower. They may remove the weeds, but the roots will remain and cause the weeds to re-surface soon. To remove the weeds permanently, they need to remove the roots too.

We sometimes feel unduly angry, greedy, lusty, envious. Though we may resolve not to feel that way, those feelings keep coming back. We need to work at uprooting them. To uproot them means to change the way we think about things, not just change the way we feel. Changing the way we think requires changing our worldview – and the Bhagavad-gita offers just such a transformational worldview.

It explains to us that we are at our core spiritual beings and we are parts of the eternal spiritual being, Krishna. We are all meant to love and serve him – and, as a part of that vision of love, to see everything in relationship with him.

The Gita (10.41) states that everything attractive in this world manifests a spark of Krishna’s splendor. So, whatever pleasure any worldly object can provide, Krishna can provide infinitely more pleasure. When we see the sense objects as connected with Krishna and understand that we can get far higher happiness by engaging those objects in his service than by seeking sense pleasure, then that changed way of looking at things will keep us spiritually absorbed and thus protected from temptation.

The Bhagavad-gita (06.30) assures that those who see Krishna everywhere are never lost to him, nor is he ever lost to them. When we start seeing worldly objects not as independent sources of pleasure, but as pointers to Krishna, who is the source of infinite pleasure, then that transformed attitude will help us change our feelings sustainably, thereby winning the war against temptation.

To know more about this verse, please click on the image
Explanation of article:

Podcast:


Download by “right-click and save”

Being grateful in general is like being married in general
See the mind not as too strong for us to resist, but as too weak to resist the world’s toys
Share This Post On

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Captcha *