We may have a million reasons to be resentful, but still resentment remains utterly unhelpful and can be horribly harmful

Life is tough. People let us down. Things go downhill for no apparent reason. We ourselves make a mess of things, often against our better judgment. Such adversities can naturally make us resentful. And we may even come up with hundreds or even millions of reasons to justify our resentment.

Despite all such reasons, the reality remains that resentment is at best utterly unhelpful and at worst it can be horribly harmful.

Utterly unhelpful: Being resentful is at best like driving a car with brakes pressed. No motion results – the only results are lot of noise and lot of wasted fuel, and of course, a lot of useless frustration.

Horribly harmful: At worst, resentment can make us not just impotently passive but also violently destructive. Resentful people may feel, “If I can’t get something good, what right does anyone have for anything good? They must have got the good by unfair means. So, I have a right to destroy them by any means, fair or foul.” Indeed, revolutions against prosperous powerful rulers are often characterized by resentment-driven indiscriminate genocides.

Pertinently, the Bhagavad-gita (18.35) cautions that self-destructive thought patterns such as resentment are typical of the dissipative and destructive mode of ignorance.

Yes, life does sometimes give us a terrible deal. But resentment ensures that we can’t make the best out of it – and it increases the probability that we may make the worst out of it.

True, not being resentful isn’t easy. But nothing worthwhile is.

Gita wisdom helps us transcend resentment by explaining that Krishna oversees everything and can bring good out of the bad, provided we play our part by striving to maintain a service attitude and prayerfully do our best.

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When life is uncomfortable, thank God that it is not unbearable
More important than the study of matter is the study of what matters
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